Thursday, June 30, 2011

John Adams, Catholics, Baptists, Anabaptists, Libertarians, and Localists on the Idea of a "Christian Nation"

  • Quoting our second president's reminder that "the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion," LewRockwell.com's Lew Rockwell says he "like[s] what the Mennonite pastor Jacob Huebert quoted had to say, that he 'recognized only one Christian nation, the church, the holy nation that is bound together by a living faith in Jesus rather than by man-made, blood-soaked borders'" — The Proper US Attitude Towards Muslims.

  • Laurence Vance, also of LewRockwell.com, responds, "Aside from all the wars the U.S. has started lately and the hundreds of thousands of foreigners that our military has killed (people that talk about the U.S. being a Christian nation have no problem with that), the U.S. is the porn and drug capital of the world, and perhaps even the abortion capital of the world" — Some Christian Nation. The Baptist oversteps things a bit, saying, "The idea that a nation can be 'Christian' is foreign to the New Testament. Only people can be Christians."

  • Speaking of Baptists, over at Front Porch Republic, Jerry Salyer takes on "the Southern Baptist Convention’s recent endorsement of citizenship for illegal immigrants" — Reconquista and the Gospel. He argues that "the right attitude toward the exotic lie between two extremes to be avoided — somewhere between xenophobia and xenophilia" and correctly states that "no opponent of mass immigration that I know of – Christian or otherwise – comes remotely close to asserting the xenophobic strawman that immigration and diversity are evil as such."
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    2 Comments:

    Blogger Dauvit Balfour said...

    Conversely (or inversely) I doubt most proponents of open borders also believe in open citizenship.

    Or maybe I'm projecting my own system. I see no reason why free and peaceful people shouldn't be able to move from one place to another to live, work, or study. That doesn't mean they should all be granted citizenship.

    10:08 PM  
    OpenID nothinghypothetical.com said...

    To live and work in a foreign country for extended periods of time is to misunderstand what citizenship is.

    3:01 AM  

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