Saturday, August 21, 2010

Abolish Copyright Laws!

"Did Germany experience rapid industrial expansion in the 19th century due to an absence of copyright law?" asks Frank Thadeusz — The Real Reason for Germany's Industrial Expansion? The article is a review of a book that argues, among other things, that "it was none other than copyright law, which was established early in Great Britain, in 1710, that crippled the world of knowledge in the United Kingdom."

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6 Comments:

Blogger love the girls said...

Good Idea. That way those who control distribution and manufacturing can further solidify their markets.

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We don't go to the book store to buy bound paper covered with randomly scattered ink spots. We buy bound paper with specifically ordered ink spots because it's the order which signifies the concepts. Those like Gary North argue that what is purchased are the paper and the ink and not the concept which is to ignore the final end of the act. But it's by the final end by which an act is known according to its essence.

11:34 PM  
Anonymous Steven P. Cornett said...

I also would like to raise up a hand for the end of copyright (or at least its severe limitation in both time & scope) for the reason that it is yet another tool given by government to an "entertainment" cartel that has hijacked culture and destroyed organic development of the arts.

In looking at the case of Katy Perry and the Beach Boys lawsuit threat, we find that it is actually Rondor Records that threatened her. Rondor Music is a subgroup of A&M Records, which is in turn owned by Vivendi SA, a European Entertainment conglomerate that began as a licensed monopoly supplier of water to city of Paris.

All of this is made more possible because we hear so much of the manufactured culture everyday that anything we do that we think is original may in fact "infringe" on multiple members of the cartel stable without even knowing it! Combine that with the fact that the same four chords are used in all popular music, as famously parodied by the Axis of Awesome, and one quickly realizes that copyright is an effective weapon the cartel has against those that try to sing or do art outside of it, such as through Youtube, where Katy Perry earned her fame.

There is also the fact that artists often appreciate when their works are referenced (as opposed to stolen or appropriated) by others. "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery" is quite true, but it is impossible when so much of the culture treasury is locked up by a media cartel that sells us sin, war, and death as casually as they sell us beer, toothpaste, and shampoo.

Copyright is another means of cultivating tyranny by the corporatist plutarchs, and should be eliminated.

11:41 PM  
Blogger love the girls said...

Steven Cornett writes : "anything we do that we think is original may in fact "infringe" on multiple members of the cartel stable without even knowing it! Combine that with the fact that the same four chords are used in all popular music"

Just as there are only so many words which rhyme with bitch, so likewise are there only so many variations when using the same four chords. Which is not to argue against intellectual property per se, but to argue that it's not always practical because ownership ceases to have meaning when multiple people can own the same object, with time of creation being the sole determining factor.

The further, the attempts to stifle imitation out of greed are the real problem because all knowledge is grounded in proceeding from that which prior known. Which were prudence comes in, what is infringement of an existing idea, versus what is imitation and improvement?

12:22 AM  
Anonymous Steven P. Cornett said...

When I mentioned the cultural hijacking of our society, also take into account the pull the cartel has in changing our laws to their advantage. Chief among them is the extension of copyright to a permanently extensible lock-in of any character created in the last century, including Batman, Wonder Woman and Superman (DC, owned by Time-Warner), as well as Spiderman and the Muppets (Marvel is a subsidiary of Walt Disney Corporation).

What encouragement to the development of the arts do the lock-in of key characters and archetypes of our culture serve?

None, which is beside the point. The corporatacracy want to own society, period.

4:23 AM  
Blogger cian.kinsella said...

Yes there is a problem with copyright law and the way it is enforced. The original idea was to reward and incentivise creativity and ensure a stream of income for creators. It is now used to guarantee a HUGE GROWING stream of income for corporate interests and for the select few very successful creators.

Meanwhile the small guy cannot get a look in, and the internet has created a channel not only for unrewarded publication, but theft too.

So don't abolish copyright law, but place a cap on how much money any one entity can make from it. The free market has not helped.

6:37 PM  
Blogger love the girls said...

cian.kinsella writes : "don't abolish copyright law, but place a cap on how much money any one entity can make from it."

That is a very good idea. I would add that the amount should be relative to money invested in R&D, and other relative criteria.

11:02 PM  

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