Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Plotinus on Ideographic Writing

    The wise men of Egypt, I think, also understood this, either by scientific or innate knowledge, and when they wished to signify something wisely, did not use the forms of letters which follow the order of words and propositions and imitate sounds and the enunciations of philosophical statements, but by drawing images and inscribing in their temples one particular image of one particular thing they manifested the non-discursiveness of the intelligible world, that is, that every image is a kind of knowledge and wisdom and is a subject of statements, all together one, and not discourse or deliberation
The above is quoted by Arturo Vasquez — On writing. Of course, the same thing can be said of the wise men of China and their writing system.

Labels: , , , ,

Bookmark and Share

2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

American born, English language raised.

I still have no idea how ideograms work.

I appreciate this guy's argument, and maybe it is a good application for totally abstract concepts.

I wonder if we could have avoided nominalism had we embraced ideograms instead of an alphabet.

6:43 PM  
Blogger The Western Confucian said...

"I wonder if we could have avoided nominalism had we embraced ideograms instead of an alphabet."

Something to ponder...

10:33 PM  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home

Omnes Sancti et Sanctæ Coreæ, orate pro nobis.