Friday, January 29, 2010

The Last American Liberal

Jeffrey Tucker on a man who "died in 1910, [when] liberalism was on the verge of transformation," and why "[b]iographers and critics have had difficulty figuring out how the same person could champion the interests of Newport capitalist class while founding the Anti-Imperialist League" — Twain's Classical Liberalism. Two of my most pleasurable publishing experiences here in Korea:

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3 Comments:

Blogger Mark in Spokane said...

There's hardly any 19th century writer who so perfectly captures America as Twain. Both in its good things and its bad things...

Essential reading!

1:52 AM  
Anonymous love the girls said...

"There's hardly any 19th century writer who so perfectly captures America as Twain. Both in its good things and its bad things..."

Hmm? Carmilla by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu seems to be a better fit.

And the 20th century writer would be Kurt Vonnegut.

And the fine artist would be "Art is what you can get away with" Andy Worhol.

3:41 AM  
Anonymous Steven P. Cornett said...

LTG:

I have to agree about Vonnegut, even in his more fantastical writings like "Cat's Cradle" which I enjoyed the most of all his books. Slaughterhouse Five was somewhat decent, but "Breakfast of Champions" ran out of steam because he decided to be profane for the sake of it and ran out of anything else to say.

OTOH, I have to say I found "Catcher in the Rye" unmemorable and, from what I remember from reading it in high school, overrated. Yet Holden Caufield is compared by the know-it-alls in the media with Huckleberry Finn.

Why? Holden was a stuck up slacker whining about how everyone else was a hypocrite.

11:48 AM  

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